Rattlin’ Cages

Some folks would swear I ask questions just to rattle cages. And…they’re right. When it comes to digging in to God’s Word, I’ve found that most, if not all, of us approach it with blinders on. Our preconceived notions of what a particular passage says based on what we’ve heard from this or that preacher or teacher clouds our ability to really see the Word for ourselves, and therefore we miss so much of the beauty and wonder, the mystery and sometimes mystical nature of the Bible. So I like to challenge folks to think outside the box, to take God’s Word at face value and dare to believe.

Revelation 11. Two witnesses show up. John has taken us back to the beginning of the tribulation. The first time through he used a wide-angle lens to capture the effects of the seal and trumpet judgments on a global scale. And now he zooms in on the events taking place in Jerusalem. During the breaking of the seals and the beginning of the trumpets, these two guys are prophesying in the city, calling down fire, shutting up the sky, turning water to blood, all for one purpose…to bring the Jewish nation to repentance. The two appear to be unstoppable until the beast shows up and slays them both and leaves their dead bodies in the streets of Jerusalem for 3 1/2 days. Then the two witnesses or caught up to heaven and a severe earthquake takes place…and the people repent. Israel becomes a believing nation once again.

Revelation 12. Using imagery from Joseph’s dream, John describes converted Israel as the mother of Messiah. Strong allusions to Genesis 3.15 permeate this section as the dragon, the serpent of old, who is the devil and satan seeks to devour the child (aka Seed of the woman). Being unsuccessful, he pursues the rest of her offspring (aka seed of the woman). A battle is waged in heaven and the dragon is cast out. (When does this occur? How does satan have access to heaven? Notice particularly that he is described as the accuser of the brethren who accuses them before God day and night.) Knowing he only has a short time, satan begins to persecute the Jews in earnest, attempting to wipe them completely out.

The Christian life is definitely a battlefield. That is nowhere more apparent than in the shocking scenes from the book of Revelation. The hero of the book is the overcomer, who we find defined in this last chapter…they overcame by the blood of the lamb and the word of their testimony and they did not love their lives even unto death. Overcoming by the blood of the lamb and the word of our testimony can be difficult enough, but not loving our lives even unto death…that’s all together different. My prayer is that God gives us the courage and the insight to live our lives in such a way that we do fear death, that we see beyond the physical to the spiritual world, and that we lay hold of that which is life indeed, each one realizing what it means to be a knight of faith.

Until next time…stay salty.

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Something old, something new

Not again. The visions come back more vivid and haunting each time. It was hard enough seeing Nebuchadnezzar’s vision of the statue.  Now I’m starting round 4 of my own visions of the future and kingdoms to come. And each vision adds more detail and yet becomes more obscure, more opaque. I’m frightened, puzzled and perplexed. I know God’s in control of the events unfolding on the world’s stage, but these visions terrify me!

Daniel 11. This is now Daniel’s 4th pass through the prophetic events of the coming Gentile kingdoms. This time in Daniel’s prophecy there is a combination of events that are now historical for us (still future for Daniel) and events that are still yet to come. Without a scorecard or a grasp of Ancient History, it’s difficult to follow what’s going on in this chapter. The first 35 verses are historical for us. Verses 36-45 appear to be still future. The first section narrows in pretty quickly to the civil wars between the Seleucids (North – Syria) and the Ptolemies (South – Egypt) post Alexander’s death in 333 B.C. Each dynasty has approximately 5 kings, and the political intrigue surrounding their reigns is summed up by Daniel (- approximately 200-300 years before the events take place!). These two warring factions are targeted because their battleground was primarily in Palestine, directly impacting the Jews in Jerusalem. The king of most interest is the final “king of the North” listed in this section, the Seleucid sovereign Antiochus IV (Epiphanes). He was the one who wreaked havoc on the Jews, forcing Hellenization on them and setting up the abomination of desolation (altar of Zeus in the temple). He will be the prototype for the future king spoken of in 36-45, the antichrist.

But why do we care? All this future stuff has to do with Israel and the Jews, right? So why do I, as a Gentile believer, care about what happens to the Jews? Because of Genesis 12. God promises Abraham that through him all the nations of the world would be blessed. Blessing comes through the nation of Israel. They are the root. They are the mother of Messiah from Revelation 12. We care about this stuff because our future is interwoven with theirs. We rise and fall with them in the end. If they don’t win, we don’t win. And if God is not faithful to Israel in the end, why do we think He will be faithful to us?

Until next time…stay salty.

Trading up

Nebuchadnezzar seemed to have it all. He had defeated every army he faced. He had envisioned and supervised a number of impressive building projects in the city of Babylon, including the famous “hanging gardens”, one of the wonders of the ancient world. He had wealth beyond compare, and he was the ruler over the vast Babylonian empire, which was considered the world power of his day. He commanded the respect of his subordinates and his peers. He was the most powerful man in the world. But one thing he lacked…and that was what Daniel and his three friends had. Daniel 4.

When Daniel and his friends were brought to Babylon, they respectfully declined to eat the king’s choice food because it violated the worship of their God. When Nebuchadnezzar had a dream, Daniel was the only one who was able to give both the dream and its interpretation with the help of his God. When Nebuchadnezzar later set up a golden image for all his leaders to worship, Hananiah (Shadrach), Mishael (Meshach) and Azariah (Abed-nego) were willing to go to a fiery death rather than bow to the image. And after both the dream and God’s deliverance of the three boys, Nebuchadnezzar acknowledged the power of the Hebrew God. Each instance was important, but the Hebrew God only seems to have been added to Nebuchadnezzar’s list of gods.

Then God gives Nebuchadnezzar a second dream. And in the dream (tree that is cut down), Nebuchadnezzar was warned that he would be humbled due to his pride. In fact, he would be given the mind of an animal until he acknowledged that God was Most High over the kingdoms of the earth. When Daniel was called in to explain the meaning of the dream, he was disturbed. But why? Could be any number of reasons…fear of the king’s anger on receiving bad news, self promotion, the good of the kingdom…but based on Daniel’s character thus far in the story, the most likely answer was that he genuinely cared for the king. He even told Nebuchadnezzar how to avoid the coming judgment…repent. But Nebuchadnezzar refused to listen, so God humbled him.

The amazing thing about this chapter is Nebuchadnezzar’s statements at both the beginning and end. He got it. You see, I believe Nebuchadnezzar traded up. He was missing a relationship with God, and he gained not only that, but also more prominence within his kingdom. God went to extraordinary links to reach this pagan king: raising his to power, two incredible dreams concerning the future, both far and near and rescuing three boys from a fiery furnace. But probably the most significant instrument that God used was Daniel himself. He gave him favor with the king, and Daniel took seriously his responsibility to serve and the relationship that followed. And through Daniel’s consistency and faithfulness, God brought the most powerful man in the world into His kingdom.

Many of us find ourselves in relationships with those who don’t have a relationship with God. Maybe they’re seeking, and maybe not. They could be your boss, your co-worker, your employee, your teacher, your student, your neighbor, your family member, etc. Do you live out a consistent testimony before them? May God find us so faithful.

Until next time…stay salty.

It’s getting hot in here

Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah all sought to remain true to God even in the midst of dire circumstances and a culture that sought to conform them to its image. When they first arrived in Babylon (exiled from Jerusalem because of the nation’s idolatry and disobedience), it started with a name-change. The names of all four boys reflected the God whom they worshiped and served. The first move of cultural re-education was to give them names that reflected the Babylonian pantheon of gods. So Daniel became Belshazzar, Hananiah became Shadrach, Mishael became Meshach, and Azariah became Abed-nego.In addition to new names, the boys were immersed in Babylonian customs and learning. The food that they were told to eat violated what their consciences dictated, so they asked for a pass, and God was merciful. Their decision to follow Him was rewarded.

Nebuchadnezzar had a dream. No one seemed to be able to interpret it for him, so he pronounced a death sentence on all his wise men (which included Daniel and his three friends). When Daniel and crew were made aware of the king’s edict, they asked for time, and God was merciful once again and granted Daniel insight and wisdom to know the dream and its interpretation. Daniel was promoted and secured high offices for his three friends. Up to this point, God seemed to be prospering Daniel and his friends in captivity. Following Him had been relatively easy.

Daniel 3. Everything changes. After Daniel interpreted Nebuchadnezzar’s dream of a statute representing successive world kingdoms (aka The Times of the Gentiles) and the subsequent destruction of those kingdoms by God’s eternal kingdom, Nebuchadnezzar took to heart Daniel’s statement that he, Nebuchadnezzar, was the head of gold and king of kings. He set up a huge golden image to which he commanded all of his officials to bow down and worship (likely both political and religious significance). Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah all refused. Nebuchadnezzar was not happy and threatened certain death for the three boys unless they complied. And now their faith was on the line…what would they do? These guys made an amazing statement, “O Nebuchadnezzar, we do not need to give you an answer concerning this matter. If it be so, our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the furnace of blazing fire; and He will deliver us out of your hand, O king. But even if He does not, let it be known to you, O king, that we are not going to serve your gods or worship the golden image that you have set up.” But even if He does not… wow. What faith. Regardless of the outcome these young men were willing to remain true to God. For them, death was not the end. But God once again was merciful and spared their lives.

These three are a stark contrast to the nation. The nation went into captivity because they continually bowed down to idols, yet these three refuse idolatry even though their lives are on the line. And they become examples for believers going through this time of Gentile domination when doing the right thing seems to bring a negative consequence…the world system is vehemently opposed to the things of God. Jesus said, “If they hate you, know that they hated Me first…” Death is not the end, but just a transition. As the author of Hebrews says, we are looking for a better kingdom than what the world has to offer, an eternal kingdom that will never be shaken and will not fade away.

Until next time…stay salty.

 

A Close Encounter

It was an encounter that forever changed my life (Gen 31-32).

Ever since I can remember I’ve known that I was destined for greatness. When I was a kid, not a day went by that my mom didn’t remind me that God had marked me out for a special purpose. And while that purpose wasn’t entirely clear as a kid, I knew it had something to do with my grandfather and the legacy that he passed down to my dad. I also knew that it was not good news for my older brother…although we were twins, he still narrowly beat me out of the womb. And as the older brother, he had the obvious right to all that belonged to my grandfather and father through his birthright and the expected blessing that would be bestowed on him by my father, including this unbelievable covenant with God. That was going to be a problem. Somehow I had to get my hands on both the birthright and the blessing.

So as time went by, I waited and looked for opportunities to gain the advantage over my brother.  Now my brother was an excellent hunter; but he was never particularly bright, so acquiring the birthright was a snap. The blessing, however, was more difficult…mainly because it involved deceiving my dad.

The idea was actually my mom’s. She knew that my dad intended to bless my brother, and it looked like my chances of realizing the destiny that she had promised me were in jeopardy. A plan was hatched and pulled off to perfection, and I left my father’s tent with his blessing. Only when my older brother returned to meet with my dad did my dad find out that I had tricked him. I felt bad about it, but it would be a small price to pay for greatness.

My brother was fuming mad, so my mother sent me to stay with her brother and find a wife among her relatives. On the way there, I met the most beautiful girl I had ever seen and found out she was my cousin, my mother’s brother’s daughter! I fell in love, and agreed to work for my uncle for the right to marry her. Seven years seemed like only a few days, but then I learned something about my uncle that I had somewhat expected…he wrote the book on deception. He tricked me into marrying his eldest daughter, and then for another seven year stint, he allowed me to marry the girl of my dreams. Fourteen years. Then he asked me to stay on to tend his flocks. We determined my wages, and I turned the tables on him. Six years later I was the master of most of his livestock, and it was clearly time to go.

My family and I fled from my uncle, but he caught up to us. We had words, but parted in peace. Now it was time to reenter the land that had been promised to my family by God.  I remember when I left the land, I saw a vision of angels ascending and descending and called the place Bethel. Now as I neared the border, I again saw angels. Preparing to meet my brother, I sent a gift to try and dissuade him from taking retribution on me. I had planned to spend the night alone, but I encountered a stranger and wrestled through the night. As the day was dawning, he tried to pull away, but I wouldn’t let him. Then he touched my thigh, and all my strength left me. I clung to him and asked him to bless me. He asked my name…curious. I told him, and he gave me a new name, saying that I had wrestled with men and with God and had prevailed. What! At that moment, I knew that somehow the man I had been wrestling with was God! And I named the place Peniel (face of God) and limped away.

Reflecting back on that episode I realized something. That wrestling match was a metaphor for my life up to that point. Even though God had promised great things for me, I always felt the need to fight for myself. I had lived up to my name, “heel grabber” (Jacob). All my life I had been grabbing the heel of my brother, my father, my uncle and of God. But God changed my name, and my outlook changed as well. My new name was “God fights” (Israel). And now God would be the one who would fight for me. The ironic thing is, He had been fighting for me all along, but I never realized it. Twenty plus years of struggling to make things happen for myself…broken relationships, lies, deception…but now a new chapter. And my prayer for you this new year is that you will cease striving and recognize that God is the one who wants to fight for you. It doesn’t mean that you don’t have a role to play in the working out of His design, His destiny for your life. But it does mean that you need to trust Him with all your heart and not yourself, acknowledge Him in all your ways, and He will direct your paths.

Until next time…stay salty.

Mission Impossible

Have you ever been asked to do something so seemingly outrageous and beyond your ability that you’re only option was to pray? Abraham’s servant (Let’s call him Eliezer.) can relate. In Genesis 24, Abraham requests that his most trusted servant, Eliezer, take an oath to find a wife for his son Isaac among Abraham’s relatives back in Paddan Aram. In an age before google maps and on-board navigation, finding the area where Abraham’s relatives lived would be difficult enough, but add to that the likelihood that once said maiden is found that she would be willing to leave her family and travel to a distant country to marry a man she’s never met, and you really do have an impossible mission.

But Eliezer heads out anyway. As the journey begins, he prays that the LORD would be merciful to his master Abraham and grant him (Eliezer) success on his quest. He asks for an unusual sign to designate the chosen mate, (not unlike what Gideon asked for hundreds of years later with the fleece) which was that the woman to whom he asked a drink of water would in turn offer to water his camels as well. To us that may not sound like a remarkable request, but given the fact that watering the camels could have been a very arduous task requiring several hours worth of work, the willingness of a young maiden to undertake it would indeed be noteworthy.

Lo and behold Rebekah shows up. She offers not only to get Eliezer a drink, but also to water his camels as well! He dares to hope. Then he finds out that she is a relative of Abraham’s! Looks like success. But now comes the tricky part where he needs to ask Rebekah (and permission from her brother Laban and mother Bethuel) to return with him. Will she do it? Without hesitation, Rebekah says, “I will go with him.” Much like Abraham’s willingness to leave his family and go, now Rebekah will do the same thing. Eliezer is so blown away by the LORD’s hand at work, that he repeats the story several times in the narrative, and the faithfulness of God is on display.

My wife questioned whether asking for a sign is evidence of a lack of faith…good question. But I believe that the willingness to follow God and do what He wanted motivated Eliezer to request a sign. The same is true for us. The next time we are given an impossible mission, and our our desire is to follow where God is leading, but it doesn’t seem clear, may we ask for a sign, for clear direction for the path ahead. And then let’s celebrate God’s faithfulness in directing our steps.

Until next time…stay salty.

On trial

Ever gotten in trouble for something you didn’t do? I have. I was in the second grade. It was early Monday morning. After breakfast, Dad began, “Son, I heard that some kids were throwing rocks (it was gravel) at each other yesterday evening at church and hit several cars. Do you know anything about it?” “No, Dad,” was my immediate response. “Are you sure, because someone said that they saw you out there with them?” I replied a little more apprehensively this time, “I saw the kids, but I wasn’t throwing rocks.” “Son, I think you’re lying to me.” Growing terror now, “No, Dad, I wasn’t throwing rocks!” Several swats later with tears streaming down my face, just as my dad was starting to believe me, “Yes, Dad, I threw rocks, too.” Three more swats for lying. To this day, I still don’t think I threw rocks, but I wanted to bring an end to the spanking.

Acts 24-26, Paul can relate to being falsely accused. Three different trials, three different Gentile authorities, three declarations of innocence (at least of anything worthy of death). With Felix, the Jewish leaders bring in the big guns, the lawyer Tertullus. Quickly Paul goes from being accused of bringing a Gentile into the Temple precincts to being accused of starting riots, introducing a new religion to the empire and desecrating the Temple. A guilty verdict on any one of the three charges could easily mean the death penalty. Rome did not tolerate insurrectionists, introducing a new religion was a capital offense, and the Romans had given the Jews permission to kill any Gentile who violated the Temple. It looks like Paul is in big trouble, but you wouldn’t suspect that from his cool demeanor (unlike this scared 7 year old boy). Instead he calmly addresses the court, refuting the charges of insurrection and of defiling the Temple. And then he spends a great deal of time explaining that the primary issue was Jesus, as it had always been. He was on trial for the hope of the resurrection…a hope that he shared with his Jewish brethren. Since the time of Abraham and the beginnings of the Jewish nation and even all the way back to Adam, the people of God had been looking for the Genesis 3:15 Seed of the Woman, the Messiah, the Davidic King who would crush the head of the serpent and redeem all of creation along with every person who believes. Paul said Jesus was and is the Guy…He is the First of the Resurrected, the Jews disagreed. That was the crux of the argument. Although Felix informally dismisses the charges against Paul, he nevertheless keeps Paul in prison for the next two years, frequently visiting him, hoping to receive a bribe, but instead receiving the gospel, which cuts him to the quick.

At the end of Felix’s term, Festus takes over as governor. Festus is ready to clean up Felix’s mess and so looks into the charges against Paul. There doesn’t seem to be anything to the charges, but in an effort to please the Jews, he asks Paul if he is willing to be tried in Jerusalem. Paul, knowing that Jerusalem would be a death sentence, appeals to Caesar. Festus acquiesces. King Agrippa happens to be in town, and aware of his intimate knowledge of the Jews, Festus asks him to hear Paul’s case. Agrippa agrees, and Paul defends himself yet again. This time he describes his life before conversion, his conversion experience on the Damascus road, and his commission to preach the gospel to both Jew and Gentile. At the conclusion of his defense, he is once again declared innocent, but as he has appealed to Caesar, Paul now must go to Rome.

It’s easy to blow past these three chapters on the way to finish the book of Acts, and I even considered not writing on them; but I was struck with the similarity between Paul’s experience and Jesus’ experience with the mock trials and declarations of innocence from Gentile authorities and the vitriolic hatred and rejection by those who do not believe. Jesus said the same would happen to those who follow Him. So what about you? Are you ready to be falsely accused, to be misunderstood, to be mistreated and persecuted and rejected for the sake of the Name? I have a feeling that those times are not far off my friend. But may we face those times with courage and grace, fiercely trusting in Jesus and leaning into the Holy Spirit for the strength to finish well, proclaiming the gospel until our time on earth is done.

Until next time…stay salty.

The Outsiders

The gospel is good news. It’s the story of God’s redeeming work, reconciling mankind to Himself. It’s the story that’s been unfolding since the beginning chapters of Genesis, from the dawn of time, and will continue to the final chapters of Revelation, to the end of time as we know it, when Jesus returns and establishes a new heavens and a new earth. It’s a story for all people at all times. But it didn’t always appear that way.

Genesis 12. God chooses Abraham to be the father of the Jewish nation and reveals that through him all the nations of the world would be blessed. Moses recounts the story for the children of Israel coming out of Egypt as he rehearses their history and the God who has saved them. God makes a shocking statement to this motley crew, “You will be to Me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation.” Over and over again throughout the Old Testament, the Israelite nation is reminded of their privileged position and relationship with God, while the nations are pictured as His enemies, as outsiders. So no doubt, the early church, being primarily Jewish, struggles with the inclusion of the Gentiles (the nations) into the fold.

The story of the conversion of Cornelius in the book of Acts should have settled the question of God’s acceptance of the nations. It’s always been a part of His plan. But this early Jewish church is faced with a major dilemma. If the Gentiles are welcomed in, it will mean a final irreparable break with Judaism. And so some of the converts from the ruling parties of the Jews have a hard time seeing the Gentiles come to faith without first becoming Jews because it feels like they are turning their backs on their Jewish heritage.

Yet it is undeniable that God is at work among the Gentiles through the ministries of Paul and Barnabas. And the Jerusalem church, at the first church council, supports them. The outsiders are in. They don’t have to become insiders first, they don’t have to become Jews, to be Christian. And Luke, writing for a predominantly Gentile audience, records this for his readers.  And as the book of Acts unfolds, Luke turns a subtle spotlight on another group of would be outsiders – women. Both in Jesus’ ministry and now in Paul’s, a number of prominent women begin to take part as the gospel goes out to the ends of the earth. The gospel is good news for all.

Until next time…stay salty.

Tripped up again

 

My first ministry assignment out of seminary was a medium-sized church in a small town in Nebraska. Coming from the sprawling metropolis of Dallas-Ft Worth composed of millions of people to the somewhat more modest Lexington with a mere ten thousand souls was quite a culture shock. Going from the land of malls and movies, of shopping and spending, of busy schedules and out-of-control lives to the relative quiet of the country was refreshing, but it was clear that we “weren’t from around here”. I remember the comment (or complaint) made about how far the Wal-Mart was from town. It took almost 10 minutes to get there. Really…in Dallas it takes 10 minutes to get out of your neighborhood. But after living in Lexington for a year, we were already immersed in the culture. I found myself complaining about the drive to Wal-Mart. My wife had even learned to “put up corn”. And after 3 years we moved back to Dallas – an even bigger culture shock from Midwest small town life. But once again we’ve adjusted to life in the city. I’ve learned that I’m adaptable. It may take me awhile, but I can and eventually do conform to the culture around me. And being adaptable is a good thing, right?

James 4. The gloves come off. Up to this point, James has admonished; and he’s corrected. Now he’s going for the jugular. What’s the source of conflicts and struggles? It’s your selfishly motivated lusts that drive you. The same ones that drive me. And when those two collide, there’s quite an explosion. Imagine two two-year-olds throwing a tantrum over the toy they both want times a hundred. Far from loving our neighbor, we are in danger of murdering them to get our own way. Instead of seeing others from God’s perspective as those who are uniquely created in His image and purchased with Christ’s blood, we look at them from a worldly perspective as means to further our own selfish ends – to be used or discarded as dictated by our whims.

Jesus said in the Sermon on the Mount, “You cannot serve two masters; you will either hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to one and despise the other. You can’t serve God and money.” James simply says, “You can’t be a friend of both God and the world.” You have to choose one. Trying to serve both is adultery. Wow…very strong language.

James writes to the Jewish diaspora…Jewish believers scattered throughout the Roman Empire. Not just a single church. It’s not a singular problem. It’s a universal problem. You see, we’re all adaptable. And living in this world, it tends to mold us. It shapes our way of thinking and of interacting with those around us. It takes a very strong opposite thrust to resist the centrifical force of this world’s pull.

But God doesn’t want to leave us in this miserable state of being conformed to this world. He is jealous for us. His desire is that we grow to maturity, that, far from being conformed to this world, we become conformed to the image of His Son. James’ solution: back to the basics – submit to God, resist the devil, cleanse your hands, purify your hearts, humble yourself, control your tongue…only possible as we receive the Word implanted, as we become doers of the Word and not hearers only, as we ask God for wisdom to interpret our circumstances from His perspective.

Being adaptable can be a very good thing, especially when it is informed by the truth of God’s Word. Until next time…stay salty.

 

A Question of Perspective

It was early morning. Two men stood on the wall of the city looking out over the enormous army amassed against them. For months now, one of these men has been sending warnings to the king of the land about the traps set by these marauding invaders. The king of Aram has had enough of his plans being foiled. He sends his warriors en masse to capture the prophet Elisha. And now here they are, surrounding the city.

Elisha’s servant is terrified, and rightfully so. The citizens of the city are unlikely to fight to defend the two men. And he asks the question that any of us would ask, “What are we to do?” Elisha responds, “Do not fear, for those who are with us are more than those who are with them.” Then he prays. He prays that his servant’s eyes might be opened. God answers his prayer, and Elisha’s servant sees “the mountain full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elijah.”

Two people. Two totally different perspectives. James tackles this issue of perspective in chapter 2 as he challenges his readers about the way they view those around them. His audience was apparently guilty of showing favoritism to the rich in their assembly. The wealthy were given places of honor, while the poor where relegated to the “cheap seats” and treated with at least mild contempt. Any such judgment based on outward appearance is wrong. For God has created us all in His image, and although that image was marred in the fall, it is still there. That is the basis of the command to love our neighbor as ourself which James calls the “royal law”. And when we focus on the externals, we fail to see the infinite value that each person has in the eyes of God.

When I, when we, make judgments about others from an earthly perspective (wealth, beauty, status, brains, etc.), we are looking only at the temporary, earthly things…the things that are destined for destruction. We are like Elisha’s servant who could only see his circumstances – what was are right in front of him – and he missed the deeper truth that God was right there with him all the time. We too miss the deeper spiritual realities, that are every bit as true, all around us…such as the people that God has given us to love. And a failure to love is a failure to keep any of the commandments, because love is the foundation of them all. James is continually calling us to see life from God’s perspective. And if we can’t, he admonishes us to pray for the wisdom to be able to do so.

I pray that God would give you the ability to see your world – your circumstances, yourself and others around you – through His eyes.

Until next time, stay salty.